Finally finished Jane Eyre and now on to The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Charlotte’s sister, Anne Bronte! I loveeeddd Jane Eyre and I hope I like the other Bronte books just as well! I had only ever seen the Jane Eyre movie and I can now say that the book is one million times better than the movie. So many details are left out of the movie and you definitely don’t get all the feels between Jane and Mr. Rochester ❀

This beautiful Penguin Clothbound Classic needs no accessories 😊

Happy May everyone!! I took spring cleaning to the next level today and knocked productivity on its a** πŸ‘Š My bookshelves and desk are organised, my room smells like apples, and my new bullet journal is ready for journaling! I also finished Little Women and decided that I want to read the next book in the series, Little Men, for the first time at some point!

Next is The Sorcerer’s Stone for the millionth time, which I can hopefully finish in a day so I can be on track for Jane Eyre!

I have big goals for May including reading four Bronte sisters works and journaling on a regular basis. Does anyone else feel that fresh spring air and have big goals for themselves?

How beautifully this cover blends with the flowers 🌼🌸🌼

I love reading a book you haven’t read in a long time and coming upon small happenings you didn’t remember from past readings 😊 And on the other hand, I also love knowing that certain things happen and being able to happily anticipate them! This reading of Little Women is so fun for me because it’s my first time reading it as an adult and you don’t realize how much an adult view changes your opinion on things until you re-read certain events! Has anyone else experienced this with a favorite childhood read??

“Jo’s ambition was to do something very splendid; what it was she had no idea, but left it for time to tell her; and meanwhile, found her greatest affliction in the fact that she couldn’t read, run, and ride as much as she liked” (Little Women, 58).

When we read books, most of us tend to associate ourselves with one of the main characters. It’s just human nature to look for similar qualities in characters we like. When I was younger, I always related most to Jo in Little Women. I hadn’t read Little Women in a long time so I was curious if she would still be my main girl. Well, based off this quote, I’m gonna say yes. I think it’s safe to say a lot of young women want to do something splendid in their lifetime and it’s heartening when there are fictional characters to relate to in regards to that.  It’s also heartening to know that Louisa May Alcott based Jo on herself and Ms. Alcott ended up as one of America’s most beloved authors ❀

*Artwork by Norman Rockwell!

My classic literature journey will continue with the Bronte sisters but I’m taking a quick break to read my favorite, Little Women! This story has everything: family, love, friendship, and valuable life lessons. But best of all, it’s set in New England with all the comfy, New England-y feels 🍎🌳😊🍁. Seriously though, this is a great book for young readers! It’s long enough to be a challenge but it’s entertaining, realistic, and as mentioned above, teaches valuable lessons πŸ™‚

HAPPY WORLD BOOK DAY!!πŸŽ‰πŸ“šπŸŽ‰ I know many of us have our own special reading places and this chair is mine! It was originally my grandmother’s “lady’s chair” and when she passed away, it was passed on to me. This chair is so well loved that it’s already been re-upholstered and it has followed me from bedroom to bedroom! These are the books I grew up reading in my chair and that have stayed with me over the years  when many others were donated (may the odds be ever in their favor 😏).

I think I may have found a new Austen favorite! Persuasion, where have you been all my life? I think I’m in love with this book 😍  This is one of Austen’s later works and it shows! Everything from the tone to the relationships to the heroine, Miss  Anne Elliot,  is more mature.

Yes, I love the romance aspect– Captain Wentworth is certainly swoonworthy– but what I love most about this book is the family relationships and friendships. This particular set of characters is the most relatable I’ve come across in all of Austen’s stories. It’s sometimes hard for me to remember that Austen’s stories are set during a real time period because her writing and characters are so different from what I’m used to, and this makes it difficult to immerse myself in the setting. But this was not a problem with Persuasion!This lovely illustration by C.E. Brock is my favorite so far because it depicts a scene that could very well happen today! Anne’s young nephew is jumping on her while she’s attending to her other nephew and Captain Wentworth pulls him off her. It’s such a normal situation that Austen doesn’t often write about.
I adore Anne and most of the secondary characters and I highly recommend this book for anyone simply looking for a nice, light read or anyone looking for a book to write a paper on!

I finished Sense and Sensibility and am very content with the ending. As I mentioned in my previous post,  I wasn’t sure how Austen was going to pull off a happy ending with less than 100 pages to go but, per usual, she managed! I started the book favoring Marianne, but Elinor deserves so much respect. I think I relate more with Marianne which is why I liked her more at first, but Elinor is so calm and reasonable when Marianne is freaking out and you can only admire her good sense. The sisters are a wonderful duo and even when they’re down and hurting, they treat each other well. I think Marianne had the most growing to do and she certainly accomplished it in the end. And Elinor so deserved a happy ending, which she got πŸ™‚
I’m not a fan of some secondary characters, mainly Fanny and John Dashwood who are incredibly rude to the Mrs. Dashwood and the Dashwood sisters. John is their brother yet he is so easily influenced by his wife, Fanny, to ignore their father’s dying wish to leave the Dashwood women some money to live on. John improved a little as the story progressed but he’s still a bit of a prat by the end. Other secondary characters I really liked and felt them to be more genuine than other Austen characters.

Overall, I really enjoyed Sense and Sensibility. It’s more satirical than Mansfield Park, which I currently feel to be the most sedate of Austen’s works, but also takes a more thoughtful stance on certain aspects of love and human nature.

***MUST READ ALERT*** 

The Moth Presents, All These Wonders

Alright people, let me tell you about this book. If you know anything about The Moth, then you already know this a is must read. For those of you who don’t know about The Moth, that’s OK because I didnt either! 
I saw this book on the NY Times bestseller list and I was hooked by the gorgeous cover (I mean look at it). Then I read the synopsis which lead me to researching “The Moth”. The short version is this: The Moth is an oral storytelling movement that started in the ’90s and became super popular. People would put on these low budget shows where storytellers would do their thing. Now there’s a whole podcast series and this, plus one other, book. Like I said, I had never heard of any of this but now I’m preaching about it because THE STORIES ARE SO GOOD! 

I’ve been reading a few stories a day in between my Austen time and they seriously put life into perspective. I’ve literally laughed out loud and cried (fair warning, you might not want to read it in public because you may get emotional…or I’m just a super emotional person πŸ˜„). The best part about it though is how real the storytellers are. They aren’t afraid to let people in. Most of the storytellers are super smart and/or famous but you don’t know that until you get to the end of their story because they seem so normal. The small blurbs at the end of each story fill you in on the storyteller’s life and achievements and most of the time I’m like wow, that person seems so normal from their story but they’re a Nobel Prize winner (or something equally impressive). So please consider reading this book because it may very well change your life! Or at least your outlook on it